Somerset Cuts: £30m cuts package unveiled

Somerset Cuts: £34m cuts package unveiled

Somerset Cuts: £34m cuts package unveiled

First published in How the spending cuts will affect you

SOMERSET County Council has unveiled a new wave of cuts amounting to £30million.

Far-reaching proposals due to be considered by the authority’s cabinet committee on Wednesday come hard on the heels of a raft of measures designed to save £43million that was approved last month.

Taunton’s Trades Council is calling on people across the county to support a lobby of the meeting outside Shire Hall at 9.30am.

Secretary Nigel Behan said: “Not content with slashing £43million from the budget at its November meeting, the county council is now preparing to take a further £30million from public services.”

The full council is then due to approve the measures on December 22.

Council leader Cllr Ken Maddock (Con) said the cuts were needed to tackle the debt mountain and to cope with a fall in the amount of cash the council receives from the Government.

He said: “Every saving we face is a really difficult choice, but we have no easy answer - we have to take tough decisions.”

Estimates show the authority was likely to be £410million in the red in the next three years, but the cuts will mean the debt is expected to fall to £340million.

To check out the agenda for the meeting, click on the Related Link below.

Proposed Cuts include:

POLICING

  • Scrap funding for PCSO supporting Trading Standards.
  • Withdraw all funding for Crime & Disorder Reduction Partnerships.

£80,000 savings. Possible impact: increased crime and disorder, higher fear of crime among vulnerable people and could jeopordise council’s relations with police.

WASTE SERVICES:

  • Relocation of Somerset Waste Partnership to a partner office to save rent.
  • Further promotion of home composting to divert items sent to recycling centres.

£81,000 savings, four redundancies. Impact: The county could lose its “leading edge”.

HIGHWAYS & TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT:

  • Small reduction in minor carriageway, footway and kerb works.
  • Additional income in traffic management.

£140,000 savings, two jobs. Risk: Increased legal claims against the council.

CABINET:

  • Reduction in size.

£38,600 savings.

YOUR SOMERSET NEWSPAPER:

  • Cease publication.

£32,500 savings. Impact: less engagement with the public.

LEARNING DISABILITIES CONTRACTS:

  • Renegotiation of hourly rates and night provision.

£250,000 savings.

COMMISSIONING CARE & SUPPORT:

  • Combining commissioning of care and support.

£120,000, four staff.

COMMISSIONING NIGHT CARE:

  • Redesigning night care for people with learning disabilities.

£250,800 savings, 45 posts.

SENIOR MANAGEMENT:

  • Reduce heads of service from four to three.

£83,600 savings, one position.

PHYSICAL REGENERATION:

  • Management and service level reductions in scientific services and physical regeneration.

£100,000 savings, two jobs. Impact: reduction in testing and analysis of food stuff, asbestos and environmental areas.

ENVIRONMENTAL DIRECTORATE:

  • Reduction in legal expenditure.
  • Assimilation of staff terms and conditions.
  • Staff reductions in Rights of Way due to reduced maintenance of the network.
  • Savings from joint working with district councils.
  • Cutting a grant.

£133,000 savings, 12 posts. Risk: increased likelihood of legal challenges.

STAFFING, SUPPLIES AND SERVICES AND SURVEYS:

  • Admin post to go.
  • Reduce spending on surveys, supplies and services.

£39,000 savings, one post.

BUSINESS RATES:

  • Reduce secretarial post.

£42,300 savings, one job.

HUMAN RESOURCES:

  • Reconfiguration of service.
  • Cuts to supplies and services budget.

£30,000 savings, two posts.

REGISTRATION SERVICE:

  • Increased income from approved premises weddings.
  • Staff leavers replaced by ‘ceremony-only’ staff on lower grade.

£25,000 savings.

Comments (24)

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2:38pm Wed 8 Dec 10

artful280 says...

So the above cuts amount 1 1/2 million, so where is the rest of the 30 million in cuts coming from?
So the above cuts amount 1 1/2 million, so where is the rest of the 30 million in cuts coming from? artful280
  • Score: 0

2:56pm Wed 8 Dec 10

the-doctor46 says...

put in a ceiling wage of £60k for public sector workers - sheila wheeler, ken maddock etc. That should save about another £250k. Best of all it wouldn't affect anything!
put in a ceiling wage of £60k for public sector workers - sheila wheeler, ken maddock etc. That should save about another £250k. Best of all it wouldn't affect anything! the-doctor46
  • Score: 0

4:39pm Wed 8 Dec 10

Jsomerset says...

the-doctor46 wrote:
put in a ceiling wage of £60k for public sector workers - sheila wheeler, ken maddock etc. That should save about another £250k. Best of all it wouldn't affect anything!
That's a very valid point! Neither of those people are vulnerable or need support. I would say cutting their wages would be the most sensible move yet, leaving money available to those that need it.

Oh, to those that say if you don't pay high wages you don't get quality staff--- I can find one right away to fill the post, and would do it at the lower wage. There, job done, saved money, and no cuts to those that desperately need it.

COUNCILLORS
You are the voting hand and most of you all work very hard, as do the two top earners but really, do you want to see key workers jobs cut back, and vulnerable people, whos lives are already difficult, have there support cut, when simply cutting wages from the top would solve the problem?

Their huge wages or their support, you choose.
[quote][p][bold]the-doctor46[/bold] wrote: put in a ceiling wage of £60k for public sector workers - sheila wheeler, ken maddock etc. That should save about another £250k. Best of all it wouldn't affect anything![/p][/quote]That's a very valid point! Neither of those people are vulnerable or need support. I would say cutting their wages would be the most sensible move yet, leaving money available to those that need it. Oh, to those that say if you don't pay high wages you don't get quality staff--- I can find one right away to fill the post, and would do it at the lower wage. There, job done, saved money, and no cuts to those that desperately need it. COUNCILLORS You are the voting hand and most of you all work very hard, as do the two top earners but really, do you want to see key workers jobs cut back, and vulnerable people, whos lives are already difficult, have there support cut, when simply cutting wages from the top would solve the problem? Their huge wages or their support, you choose. Jsomerset
  • Score: 0

6:21pm Wed 8 Dec 10

rockwell says...

Yes we need a top ceiling on any wage in the public sector. £60k seems reasonable, no generous to me.
Yes we need a top ceiling on any wage in the public sector. £60k seems reasonable, no generous to me. rockwell
  • Score: 0

7:37pm Wed 8 Dec 10

Mc@Cloud says...

Reduce heads of service from four to three.
£83,600 savings, one position.

Yeh for one person its a joke.

Can't find reduce salary of chief excutive a reasonable renumeration rate like 60k. Saving over £100k.

Impact :none! we could get many a talented ce for £60k which is the same sort of money as mp!
Reduce heads of service from four to three. £83,600 savings, one position. Yeh for one person its a joke. Can't find reduce salary of chief excutive a reasonable renumeration rate like 60k. Saving over £100k. Impact :none! we could get many a talented ce for £60k which is the same sort of money as mp! Mc@Cloud
  • Score: 0

8:51pm Wed 8 Dec 10

D1040 says...

Well said Mc@Cloud, shear disgrace and disgusting, what have they been wasting our money on for years gone, this does not reflect the money lost in a certain Icelandic Bank either!
Well said Mc@Cloud, shear disgrace and disgusting, what have they been wasting our money on for years gone, this does not reflect the money lost in a certain Icelandic Bank either! D1040
  • Score: 0

8:54pm Wed 8 Dec 10

D1040 says...

Jsomerset wrote:
the-doctor46 wrote: put in a ceiling wage of £60k for public sector workers - sheila wheeler, ken maddock etc. That should save about another £250k. Best of all it wouldn't affect anything!
That's a very valid point! Neither of those people are vulnerable or need support. I would say cutting their wages would be the most sensible move yet, leaving money available to those that need it. Oh, to those that say if you don't pay high wages you don't get quality staff--- I can find one right away to fill the post, and would do it at the lower wage. There, job done, saved money, and no cuts to those that desperately need it. COUNCILLORS You are the voting hand and most of you all work very hard, as do the two top earners but really, do you want to see key workers jobs cut back, and vulnerable people, whos lives are already difficult, have there support cut, when simply cutting wages from the top would solve the problem? Their huge wages or their support, you choose.
I would do his job for 25% of his salary given the chance anything for a free parking space with my name on a sign :)))
[quote][p][bold]Jsomerset[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]the-doctor46[/bold] wrote: put in a ceiling wage of £60k for public sector workers - sheila wheeler, ken maddock etc. That should save about another £250k. Best of all it wouldn't affect anything![/p][/quote]That's a very valid point! Neither of those people are vulnerable or need support. I would say cutting their wages would be the most sensible move yet, leaving money available to those that need it. Oh, to those that say if you don't pay high wages you don't get quality staff--- I can find one right away to fill the post, and would do it at the lower wage. There, job done, saved money, and no cuts to those that desperately need it. COUNCILLORS You are the voting hand and most of you all work very hard, as do the two top earners but really, do you want to see key workers jobs cut back, and vulnerable people, whos lives are already difficult, have there support cut, when simply cutting wages from the top would solve the problem? Their huge wages or their support, you choose.[/p][/quote]I would do his job for 25% of his salary given the chance anything for a free parking space with my name on a sign :))) D1040
  • Score: 0

10:52am Thu 9 Dec 10

artful280 says...

As i have commented previously reduce the employers pension contribution from nearly 15% of salary to match what the employees put in of 6.8 % on average. This would be on par with the private sector.

That would save £10 million pounds a year of our money (worked out from their own report on the scc website)that is funding their pensions.

I struggle enough to fund my own properly without subsidising people who earn a hell of alot more than me !!!
As i have commented previously reduce the employers pension contribution from nearly 15% of salary to match what the employees put in of 6.8 % on average. This would be on par with the private sector. That would save £10 million pounds a year of our money (worked out from their own report on the scc website)that is funding their pensions. I struggle enough to fund my own properly without subsidising people who earn a hell of alot more than me !!! artful280
  • Score: 0

11:10am Thu 9 Dec 10

SteveGerman says...

The fight goes on against fees and cuts

AN UPRISING has occurred of school, college and university students, fighting for their futures. The trigger has been the trebling of tuition fees, but the anger is wider - against the removal of the Education Maintenance Allowance (EMA), the massive cuts proposed in education, and the robbing of a decent future from an entire generation. The culmination of this phase of the student campaign will be when parliament votes on fees on Thursday 9 December, as thousands upon thousands of students walk out all over the country and demonstrate outside parliament.
The movement has shocked the government and mainstream parties. Already there have been victories in Wales and Scotland (see page five). However, defeating the Con-Dem government, ideologically wedded to a rolling back of the welfare state, is a taller order.
Immense anger has been expressed against the Lib Dems who pledged not to increase fees and are now advocating the opposite. Their party is in chaos and their leadership vilified just months after taking their places in the coalition government. Even Tories are wobbling, with David Davis, former shadow home secretary, saying he will vote against the government.
Nevertheless, the likelihood is that the increase in fees will be voted through on Thursday. If so, many young people will be bitterly disappointed and may think that there is now nothing that can be done. Many will be furious and that rage could explode onto the streets.
The first thing young people need to know is that this is not the end. The fees increase will not be implemented until autumn 2012. There is time. The poll tax, for example, was not beaten in one rush; in fact it became law in 1988 and was defeated in 1991. The withdrawal of EMA will start, for new applications, in January. Devastating cuts facing universities will come in over a period of time, with the 80% cut in teaching budgets being declared in April. Massive cuts are planned in further education (FE) funding.
The key thing now is to get organised. Up to now there has been no real overall leadership or organisation, although in many local areas Youth Fight for Jobs/Education has organised the protests. The National Union of Students (NUS) has displayed a complete dereliction of duty. From the high of the 10 November demonstration, the size of which surprised leaders of NUS more than anyone, they immediately plunged to the depths of attacking protesters at Millbank, and have since failed to act. Their call for a "glow stick vigil" on Day X - not even at parliament! - underlines the irrelevance NUS has quickly become to many students.

This is a long game, and we need a strategy. The protests have been exhilarating, but it will not be sufficient to just keep calling days of action on Facebook, as has largely been the case so far. If students do not have a say in what action is called, there is a risk that they will get worn down. It is a step forward that there are now regular London Student Assemblies being called. However, these mainly involve university students, not school and FE students, who have been the most audacious so far.
To defeat fees and save EMA, action on an even greater scale will be necessary. The Socialist Party calls for a huge national shutdown of education in the New Year. This will take organisation in every school, college and university. Students will need their own meetings, to discuss what they are doing and why, to learn lessons from previous struggles, to elect their own committees, and plan serious action.
Where there are no existing anti-cuts campaigns or Socialist Students groups, which is particularly the case in schools and colleges, Youth Fight for Education groups should be set up. Student groups can then be linked up on a city-wide, regional and national level.
Students in colleges and universities need to develop demands of their own college managements. Most occupations currently demand that university vice-chancellors issue statements opposing cuts and the rise in tuition fees. We should go further and demand that vice-chancellors do not implement cuts or fee increases, and instead set deficit budgets and join with students in campaigning for more funding.
Students should also make demands of local councils. It is councils who handle EMA payments and they should be pressured - like the Welsh Assembly - to keep EMA and fund it themselves. It would only cost councils a small proportion of their overall budget, while they mount a major campaign alongside students and parents for government to restore funding. Local anti-cuts unions are demanding that councils do not implement cuts.
Rightly, students are starting to link up with these campaigns, joining protests at councils. Students could go further, and support Trade Unionist and Socialist Coalition and anti-cuts candidates at the council elections in May 2011, demanding that councils maintain EMA.
Role of workers

Students have made a tremendous start but to defeat the enormity of the government's attacks they now need the might of the working class to come alongside them. There is a view amongst some in the student assemblies, and which was on display at the recent Coalition of Resistance conference, that writes off the working class and trade unions, and that simply advocates "new methods" and "direct action".
No one would argue against the freshness and audacity of the student actions. And of course students can achieve victories. In 1985, for example, a national school student strike involving 250,000 defeated the Tories' plans for slave labour YTS 'youth training schemes'. But the scale of the planned attacks is so great, with the capitalist class attempting to force the working class and youth to pay for their historic crisis, that student power alone is limited. The working class, on the other hand, when it moves, can threaten the very heart of capitalism. Strike action can bring society to a halt.
The student movement has been an inspiration to workers. On Day X, the National Shop Stewards Network (NSSN) has called for trade unionists to march behind their banner. How tremendous it would have been if there had been a national Trade Union Congress (TUC) demonstration on 11 December, as the Socialist Party had campaigned for. However, the conservative leadership of the TUC and some of the trade unions cannot hold back the working class forever - the public sector cuts are so devastating that workers will be forced to act. A movement is possible that brings together the energy of youth with the power of the working class. We must now demand that opposition to the increase in fees and the abolition of EMA should be one of the demands of the TUC 26 March demo.
The NSSN anti-cuts conference on 22 January will be an important step in bringing together students and trade unionists. Rooted in the trade unions, the NSSN has worked in alliance with some of the most militant workers at this stage, and in January will be debating launching a national anti-cuts campaign with the organised working class at its heart, alongside young people and community campaigns (visit www.socialistparty.o
rg.uk for reports).
The TUC has been forced, by pressure from Youth Fight for Jobs (YFJ) and the PCS civil service union Young Members Network, to organise a youth rally on 29 January. YFJ has decided to call a demonstration to this rally, to gather together young workers, unemployed and students. In March, the teaching union NUT and university and college union UCU are likely to be taking coordinated strike action. It is important that students support these actions. In fact students should visit the picket lines of other workers on strike to make links - as some students did, visiting the RMT tube worker pickets in London in November.
In these early stages of the movement, political understanding is raw, but young people are learning fast and, in tasting their collective strength for the first time, are also questioning everything. For many, an understanding will develop that at the root of this crisis in education is a crisis of capitalism, and that a socialist alternative is necessary.

www.socialistparty.o
rg.uk
The fight goes on against fees and cuts AN UPRISING has occurred of school, college and university students, fighting for their futures. The trigger has been the trebling of tuition fees, but the anger is wider - against the removal of the Education Maintenance Allowance (EMA), the massive cuts proposed in education, and the robbing of a decent future from an entire generation. The culmination of this phase of the student campaign will be when parliament votes on fees on Thursday 9 December, as thousands upon thousands of students walk out all over the country and demonstrate outside parliament. The movement has shocked the government and mainstream parties. Already there have been victories in Wales and Scotland (see page five). However, defeating the Con-Dem government, ideologically wedded to a rolling back of the welfare state, is a taller order. Immense anger has been expressed against the Lib Dems who pledged not to increase fees and are now advocating the opposite. Their party is in chaos and their leadership vilified just months after taking their places in the coalition government. Even Tories are wobbling, with David Davis, former shadow home secretary, saying he will vote against the government. Nevertheless, the likelihood is that the increase in fees will be voted through on Thursday. If so, many young people will be bitterly disappointed and may think that there is now nothing that can be done. Many will be furious and that rage could explode onto the streets. The first thing young people need to know is that this is not the end. The fees increase will not be implemented until autumn 2012. There is time. The poll tax, for example, was not beaten in one rush; in fact it became law in 1988 and was defeated in 1991. The withdrawal of EMA will start, for new applications, in January. Devastating cuts facing universities will come in over a period of time, with the 80% cut in teaching budgets being declared in April. Massive cuts are planned in further education (FE) funding. The key thing now is to get organised. Up to now there has been no real overall leadership or organisation, although in many local areas Youth Fight for Jobs/Education has organised the protests. The National Union of Students (NUS) has displayed a complete dereliction of duty. From the high of the 10 November demonstration, the size of which surprised leaders of NUS more than anyone, they immediately plunged to the depths of attacking protesters at Millbank, and have since failed to act. Their call for a "glow stick vigil" on Day X - not even at parliament! - underlines the irrelevance NUS has quickly become to many students. This is a long game, and we need a strategy. The protests have been exhilarating, but it will not be sufficient to just keep calling days of action on Facebook, as has largely been the case so far. If students do not have a say in what action is called, there is a risk that they will get worn down. It is a step forward that there are now regular London Student Assemblies being called. However, these mainly involve university students, not school and FE students, who have been the most audacious so far. To defeat fees and save EMA, action on an even greater scale will be necessary. The Socialist Party calls for a huge national shutdown of education in the New Year. This will take organisation in every school, college and university. Students will need their own meetings, to discuss what they are doing and why, to learn lessons from previous struggles, to elect their own committees, and plan serious action. Where there are no existing anti-cuts campaigns or Socialist Students groups, which is particularly the case in schools and colleges, Youth Fight for Education groups should be set up. Student groups can then be linked up on a city-wide, regional and national level. Students in colleges and universities need to develop demands of their own college managements. Most occupations currently demand that university vice-chancellors issue statements opposing cuts and the rise in tuition fees. We should go further and demand that vice-chancellors do not implement cuts or fee increases, and instead set deficit budgets and join with students in campaigning for more funding. Students should also make demands of local councils. It is councils who handle EMA payments and they should be pressured - like the Welsh Assembly - to keep EMA and fund it themselves. It would only cost councils a small proportion of their overall budget, while they mount a major campaign alongside students and parents for government to restore funding. Local anti-cuts unions are demanding that councils do not implement cuts. Rightly, students are starting to link up with these campaigns, joining protests at councils. Students could go further, and support Trade Unionist and Socialist Coalition and anti-cuts candidates at the council elections in May 2011, demanding that councils maintain EMA. Role of workers Students have made a tremendous start but to defeat the enormity of the government's attacks they now need the might of the working class to come alongside them. There is a view amongst some in the student assemblies, and which was on display at the recent Coalition of Resistance conference, that writes off the working class and trade unions, and that simply advocates "new methods" and "direct action". No one would argue against the freshness and audacity of the student actions. And of course students can achieve victories. In 1985, for example, a national school student strike involving 250,000 defeated the Tories' plans for slave labour YTS 'youth training schemes'. But the scale of the planned attacks is so great, with the capitalist class attempting to force the working class and youth to pay for their historic crisis, that student power alone is limited. The working class, on the other hand, when it moves, can threaten the very heart of capitalism. Strike action can bring society to a halt. The student movement has been an inspiration to workers. On Day X, the National Shop Stewards Network (NSSN) has called for trade unionists to march behind their banner. How tremendous it would have been if there had been a national Trade Union Congress (TUC) demonstration on 11 December, as the Socialist Party had campaigned for. However, the conservative leadership of the TUC and some of the trade unions cannot hold back the working class forever - the public sector cuts are so devastating that workers will be forced to act. A movement is possible that brings together the energy of youth with the power of the working class. We must now demand that opposition to the increase in fees and the abolition of EMA should be one of the demands of the TUC 26 March demo. The NSSN anti-cuts conference on 22 January will be an important step in bringing together students and trade unionists. Rooted in the trade unions, the NSSN has worked in alliance with some of the most militant workers at this stage, and in January will be debating launching a national anti-cuts campaign with the organised working class at its heart, alongside young people and community campaigns (visit www.socialistparty.o rg.uk for reports). The TUC has been forced, by pressure from Youth Fight for Jobs (YFJ) and the PCS civil service union Young Members Network, to organise a youth rally on 29 January. YFJ has decided to call a demonstration to this rally, to gather together young workers, unemployed and students. In March, the teaching union NUT and university and college union UCU are likely to be taking coordinated strike action. It is important that students support these actions. In fact students should visit the picket lines of other workers on strike to make links - as some students did, visiting the RMT tube worker pickets in London in November. In these early stages of the movement, political understanding is raw, but young people are learning fast and, in tasting their collective strength for the first time, are also questioning everything. For many, an understanding will develop that at the root of this crisis in education is a crisis of capitalism, and that a socialist alternative is necessary. www.socialistparty.o rg.uk SteveGerman
  • Score: 0

1:19pm Thu 9 Dec 10

somersetbhoy says...

SteveGerman - mate seriously, what?!any chance of an abridged version next time?
SteveGerman - mate seriously, what?!any chance of an abridged version next time? somersetbhoy
  • Score: 0

2:37pm Thu 9 Dec 10

SteveGerman says...

somersetbhoy wrote:
SteveGerman - mate seriously, what?!any chance of an abridged version next time?
Point taken Somersetbhoy. However if you aggregate all the pro-cuts posts submitted, they collectively take up more space than the anti-cuts posts. This will of course change as the inevitable movement of millions move into determined organised opposition to the austerity programme being proposed by this coalition of millionaires. In the mean time, I make no apology for the length of some of my posts. Brevity did not defeat Thatcher's hated poll tax..a mass organised campaign involving 18 million non payers did!!! This coalition is arguably much weaker than Thatcher's government was when they attempted to introduce and impose the poll tax. This government of the billionaires can be defeated!
For more information cut and paste the following link in to your browser: www.socialistparty.o
rg.uk
[quote][p][bold]somersetbhoy[/bold] wrote: SteveGerman - mate seriously, what?!any chance of an abridged version next time?[/p][/quote]Point taken Somersetbhoy. However if you aggregate all the pro-cuts posts submitted, they collectively take up more space than the anti-cuts posts. This will of course change as the inevitable movement of millions move into determined organised opposition to the austerity programme being proposed by this coalition of millionaires. In the mean time, I make no apology for the length of some of my posts. Brevity did not defeat Thatcher's hated poll tax..a mass organised campaign involving 18 million non payers did!!! This coalition is arguably much weaker than Thatcher's government was when they attempted to introduce and impose the poll tax. This government of the billionaires can be defeated! For more information cut and paste the following link in to your browser: www.socialistparty.o rg.uk SteveGerman
  • Score: 0

8:06pm Thu 9 Dec 10

the-doctor46 says...

you're a grade A **** stevegerman!! and sorry to be rude but your posts are wasting everyones time and ruining a board designed for reasoned debate, not copy and paste trash. How do you debate person to person? feed the other person sheets of A4 text? what an utter bell end you are. You aren't helping any cause by being annoying.
you're a grade A **** stevegerman!! and sorry to be rude but your posts are wasting everyones time and ruining a board designed for reasoned debate, not copy and paste trash. How do you debate person to person? feed the other person sheets of A4 text? what an utter bell end you are. You aren't helping any cause by being annoying. the-doctor46
  • Score: 0

11:18pm Thu 9 Dec 10

east-ender says...

SteveGerman wrote:
somersetbhoy wrote: SteveGerman - mate seriously, what?!any chance of an abridged version next time?
Point taken Somersetbhoy. However if you aggregate all the pro-cuts posts submitted, they collectively take up more space than the anti-cuts posts. This will of course change as the inevitable movement of millions move into determined organised opposition to the austerity programme being proposed by this coalition of millionaires. In the mean time, I make no apology for the length of some of my posts. Brevity did not defeat Thatcher's hated poll tax..a mass organised campaign involving 18 million non payers did!!! This coalition is arguably much weaker than Thatcher's government was when they attempted to introduce and impose the poll tax. This government of the billionaires can be defeated! For more information cut and paste the following link in to your browser: www.socialistparty.o rg.uk
Zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz
zzzzzzzzzzzzz
[quote][p][bold]SteveGerman[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]somersetbhoy[/bold] wrote: SteveGerman - mate seriously, what?!any chance of an abridged version next time?[/p][/quote]Point taken Somersetbhoy. However if you aggregate all the pro-cuts posts submitted, they collectively take up more space than the anti-cuts posts. This will of course change as the inevitable movement of millions move into determined organised opposition to the austerity programme being proposed by this coalition of millionaires. In the mean time, I make no apology for the length of some of my posts. Brevity did not defeat Thatcher's hated poll tax..a mass organised campaign involving 18 million non payers did!!! This coalition is arguably much weaker than Thatcher's government was when they attempted to introduce and impose the poll tax. This government of the billionaires can be defeated! For more information cut and paste the following link in to your browser: www.socialistparty.o rg.uk[/p][/quote]Zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz zzzzzzzzzzzzz east-ender
  • Score: 0

11:47am Fri 10 Dec 10

*Flick* says...

Interesting cuts, and I have to say I do not agree with a lot of them. So many redundancies over the country is only going to make the unemployment issue worse surely?
I agree with capping earnings in the public sector - it would save so much money. And anyone can live quite comfortably on £60k, although they will obviously be accustomed to luxury on the wages they have now! Poor things having to cut back for the sake of the country's economy... Oh wait a minute... Thats what Joe public are having to do.... interesting!
Interesting cuts, and I have to say I do not agree with a lot of them. So many redundancies over the country is only going to make the unemployment issue worse surely? I agree with capping earnings in the public sector - it would save so much money. And anyone can live quite comfortably on £60k, although they will obviously be accustomed to luxury on the wages they have now! Poor things having to cut back for the sake of the country's economy... Oh wait a minute... Thats what Joe public are having to do.... interesting! *Flick*
  • Score: 0

1:23pm Fri 10 Dec 10

scrumpyman says...

No-one has mentioned the tens of thousands of pounds wasted every year creating and watering the myriad of hanging baskets adorning the roads around the town. They're lovely to look at but unecessary when people are losing their jobs and services to the most needy are being reduced. Stop the Taunton in Bloom budget first!
No-one has mentioned the tens of thousands of pounds wasted every year creating and watering the myriad of hanging baskets adorning the roads around the town. They're lovely to look at but unecessary when people are losing their jobs and services to the most needy are being reduced. Stop the Taunton in Bloom budget first! scrumpyman
  • Score: 0

10:26pm Fri 10 Dec 10

SteveGerman says...

Condemn brutal policing of students
Youth Fight for Education statement

As parliament prepared to vote on Wednesday 9 December on the trebling of tuition fees, 35,000 marched to defend their futures.

Once again, many of the young people protesting will not be directly affected by these attacks, but are campaigning for the young people who follow them into education.

Joining them were trade unionists with banners from PCS, RMT, UCU, CWU, Unison, NUT, Unite and the National Shop Stewards Network, and many parents and family members.

Since Wednesday's demonstration, many workers are expressing their sympathy with the young people who were caught up in the scenes of fury and frustration outside parliament.

As MPs voted to destroy the futures of young people, they were protected by massed ranks of riot police, vans and horses, intent on crushing the young people who had the courage to stand up to them.

For weeks, school, college and university students have protested, facing extremely heavy-handed policing every time.

Routes agreed with police have been blocked, young people have been viciously kettled for hours on end, taunted and provoked.

Over 200 had been arrested even before Wednesday's events. Despite all this, young people have continued to peacefully protest, retaining the support of their families, trade unionists and the general public.

And then on Wednesday, when thousands upon thousands of young people protested in the hope that their voices might have been heard, they were faced once again with a massive police deployment.

The vast majority of Wednesday's demonstrators were not involved in throwing missiles or any other violence, despite facing kettling and charges by police horses and police with batons.




Many students correctly expressed the view that the government would be defeated by mass action, not by a minority throwing missiles.

At the same time the blame for the scenes outside parliament was rightly laid at the feet of the government and the police.

As one student said: "We've been kettled for six hours, charged by police horses and batons, while the millionaires in government take our right to education away from us."

No wonder students feel frustrated.

"The millionaires who own the press are reporting that we are violent, but in reality a whole generation is having its future violently torn away from it."

A student at SOAS who took part in the demonstration, said: "The police were responsible for the violence yesterday, it was after hours of provocative policing and students being denied democratic rights".

As the Socialist Party and Youth Fight for Education have argued, the way forward is through organisation, democratically controlled stewarding to protect protesters, and the building of mass action of students and workers together.


--------------------
--------------------
--------------------
--------------------


Watch the Socialist Party video of the Day X demo. Students explain why they are demonstrating.

http://www.socialist
party.org.uk/vids/20
10/students9Dec.flv
Condemn brutal policing of students Youth Fight for Education statement As parliament prepared to vote on Wednesday 9 December on the trebling of tuition fees, 35,000 marched to defend their futures. Once again, many of the young people protesting will not be directly affected by these attacks, but are campaigning for the young people who follow them into education. Joining them were trade unionists with banners from PCS, RMT, UCU, CWU, Unison, NUT, Unite and the National Shop Stewards Network, and many parents and family members. Since Wednesday's demonstration, many workers are expressing their sympathy with the young people who were caught up in the scenes of fury and frustration outside parliament. As MPs voted to destroy the futures of young people, they were protected by massed ranks of riot police, vans and horses, intent on crushing the young people who had the courage to stand up to them. For weeks, school, college and university students have protested, facing extremely heavy-handed policing every time. Routes agreed with police have been blocked, young people have been viciously kettled for hours on end, taunted and provoked. Over 200 had been arrested even before Wednesday's events. Despite all this, young people have continued to peacefully protest, retaining the support of their families, trade unionists and the general public. And then on Wednesday, when thousands upon thousands of young people protested in the hope that their voices might have been heard, they were faced once again with a massive police deployment. The vast majority of Wednesday's demonstrators were not involved in throwing missiles or any other violence, despite facing kettling and charges by police horses and police with batons. Many students correctly expressed the view that the government would be defeated by mass action, not by a minority throwing missiles. At the same time the blame for the scenes outside parliament was rightly laid at the feet of the government and the police. As one student said: "We've been kettled for six hours, charged by police horses and batons, while the millionaires in government take our right to education away from us." No wonder students feel frustrated. "The millionaires who own the press are reporting that we are violent, but in reality a whole generation is having its future violently torn away from it." A student at SOAS who took part in the demonstration, said: "The police were responsible for the violence yesterday, it was after hours of provocative policing and students being denied democratic rights". As the Socialist Party and Youth Fight for Education have argued, the way forward is through organisation, democratically controlled stewarding to protect protesters, and the building of mass action of students and workers together. -------------------- -------------------- -------------------- -------------------- Watch the Socialist Party video of the Day X demo. Students explain why they are demonstrating. http://www.socialist party.org.uk/vids/20 10/students9Dec.flv SteveGerman
  • Score: 0

10:35pm Fri 10 Dec 10

SteveGerman says...

Youth Democratic Rights Campaign to kettle Scotland Yard on 11th December

After yesterday's use of violence by the police against peaceful demonstrators in London and use of intimidatory tactics, Youth Fight for Jobs is launching a Youth Democratic Rights campaign.

We are kettling Scotland Yard on Saturday at 15:30 to protest against the use of the tactic in London, Bristol, Brighton, Leeds and elsewhere.

The worst case was in London on November 24th, when the police held demonstrators, many school students on their first ever protest, for over 9 hours without food, water or any toilet facilities.

The police also attacked the Day X protest today, which was a legally planned march. The police had negotiated with the protest organisers and agreed that they would allow them to march through Parliament Square.


Instead around half the march was kettled and then charged at by police horses.

Paul Callanan, Youth Fight for Jobs national organiser, says "The tactics of the police command have been disgraceful.

"This is clearly an attempt to make sure that young people don't fight back against attacks on their right to a future.

"They also know that, with a huge fight for public sector cuts brewing, many workers will be looking towards the student movement as an example.

"This is not just an attack on the students' rights but it's an attack on everybody's right to protest.

"We're kettling Scotland Yard on 11th December to show them that we will not go away and that we will fight for our rights".


Claire Laker-Mansfield, Socialist Students national organiser says "We will not back down to bullying.

"We are holding this kettle to show that we won't go away. Young people are totally right to be angry about these shameful attacks on their right to a future.

"Our protest on the 11th will show that this movement will continue and escalate.

"Young people will continue to fight for our futures".


--------------------
--------------------
--------------------
--------------------


Youth Fight for Jobs is a campaign of young trade unionists, the unemployed and students.
We organised many of the student protests that have taken place in recent weeks.
We fight against youth unemployment and for a future for young people.
We have the support of the PCS, RMT, UNITE, UCU, BECTU and CWU trade unions.
Contact YFJ/YDR on 020 8558 7947 or email youthfightforjobs@gm
ail.com See our website www.youthfightforjob
s.com
Youth Democratic Rights Campaign to kettle Scotland Yard on 11th December After yesterday's use of violence by the police against peaceful demonstrators in London and use of intimidatory tactics, Youth Fight for Jobs is launching a Youth Democratic Rights campaign. We are kettling Scotland Yard on Saturday at 15:30 to protest against the use of the tactic in London, Bristol, Brighton, Leeds and elsewhere. The worst case was in London on November 24th, when the police held demonstrators, many school students on their first ever protest, for over 9 hours without food, water or any toilet facilities. The police also attacked the Day X protest today, which was a legally planned march. The police had negotiated with the protest organisers and agreed that they would allow them to march through Parliament Square. Instead around half the march was kettled and then charged at by police horses. Paul Callanan, Youth Fight for Jobs national organiser, says "The tactics of the police command have been disgraceful. "This is clearly an attempt to make sure that young people don't fight back against attacks on their right to a future. "They also know that, with a huge fight for public sector cuts brewing, many workers will be looking towards the student movement as an example. "This is not just an attack on the students' rights but it's an attack on everybody's right to protest. "We're kettling Scotland Yard on 11th December to show them that we will not go away and that we will fight for our rights". Claire Laker-Mansfield, Socialist Students national organiser says "We will not back down to bullying. "We are holding this kettle to show that we won't go away. Young people are totally right to be angry about these shameful attacks on their right to a future. "Our protest on the 11th will show that this movement will continue and escalate. "Young people will continue to fight for our futures". -------------------- -------------------- -------------------- -------------------- Youth Fight for Jobs is a campaign of young trade unionists, the unemployed and students. We organised many of the student protests that have taken place in recent weeks. We fight against youth unemployment and for a future for young people. We have the support of the PCS, RMT, UNITE, UCU, BECTU and CWU trade unions. Contact YFJ/YDR on 020 8558 7947 or email youthfightforjobs@gm ail.com See our website www.youthfightforjob s.com SteveGerman
  • Score: 0

10:59pm Fri 10 Dec 10

SteveGerman says...

Council cuts put most vulnerable at risk
CUTS COST LIVES
Build the fightback against all cuts


The Tory/Liberal-led Birmingham council is preparing to trim £300 million from its budget by 2014 by cutting 10,000 jobs and devastating services. Amongst the cuts is its chilling proposal to set eligibility criteria for social care at 'super-critical'. This will become the norm for disabled and older people across England and Wales unless the Con-Dem cuts are stopped.


Adult social care services are provided under a 'Fair Access to Care Services' policy.

This identifies the four social services eligibility bands - low, moderate, substantial and critical.

Birmingham council is aiming to restrict formal council-funded care to people with critical personal care needs, excluding those with substantial needs and those with critical needs who do not need help with personal care.

In layman's terms, the only social services that will be funded are those that ensure disabled people with the most complex needs are fed, bathed, dressed and toileted, and kept safe from serious harm, neglect or abuse.

This move will go much further than the already draconian critical eligibility criteria of Northumberland, West Berkshire and Wokingham councils.

For now, these councils meet all critical needs, including help with involvement in work or adult education and vital social relationships or family responsibilities.

Those disabled people and family carers living in Birmingham who will no longer be eligible for help will be expected to turn to charities and the voluntary sector for information, advice, advocacy and support.

This will not be much comfort for those who need a lot of physical help to get dressed, stay clean and tidy their homes, or those who are being neglected or abused but do not qualify for support.

Neither will it help the thousands of children under 16 in Birmingham who already provide care and support to parents and siblings, or the tens of thousands of family carers.

In keeping with Cameron's Big Society, Birmingham council is emphasising the role of volunteers in the provision of some council services.

But the thousands of social care workers who struggled to work every day during the severe weather have a right to ask if volunteers would do the same thing even if a vulnerable person was relying upon them.

When Birmingham council goes 'super-critical' it will be the logical conclusion of the underfunding of social services by successive Tory and New Labour governments since the 1980s.

The Fair Access to Care Services policy was introduced by New Labour to ensure social services provision was consistent across England and Wales.

It turns out that the only consistency being achieved is the decimation of essential social services for hundreds of thousands of working class people.

www.socialistparty.o
rg.uk
Council cuts put most vulnerable at risk CUTS COST LIVES Build the fightback against all cuts The Tory/Liberal-led Birmingham council is preparing to trim £300 million from its budget by 2014 by cutting 10,000 jobs and devastating services. Amongst the cuts is its chilling proposal to set eligibility criteria for social care at 'super-critical'. This will become the norm for disabled and older people across England and Wales unless the Con-Dem cuts are stopped. Adult social care services are provided under a 'Fair Access to Care Services' policy. This identifies the four social services eligibility bands - low, moderate, substantial and critical. Birmingham council is aiming to restrict formal council-funded care to people with critical personal care needs, excluding those with substantial needs and those with critical needs who do not need help with personal care. In layman's terms, the only social services that will be funded are those that ensure disabled people with the most complex needs are fed, bathed, dressed and toileted, and kept safe from serious harm, neglect or abuse. This move will go much further than the already draconian critical eligibility criteria of Northumberland, West Berkshire and Wokingham councils. For now, these councils meet all critical needs, including help with involvement in work or adult education and vital social relationships or family responsibilities. Those disabled people and family carers living in Birmingham who will no longer be eligible for help will be expected to turn to charities and the voluntary sector for information, advice, advocacy and support. This will not be much comfort for those who need a lot of physical help to get dressed, stay clean and tidy their homes, or those who are being neglected or abused but do not qualify for support. Neither will it help the thousands of children under 16 in Birmingham who already provide care and support to parents and siblings, or the tens of thousands of family carers. In keeping with Cameron's Big Society, Birmingham council is emphasising the role of volunteers in the provision of some council services. But the thousands of social care workers who struggled to work every day during the severe weather have a right to ask if volunteers would do the same thing even if a vulnerable person was relying upon them. When Birmingham council goes 'super-critical' it will be the logical conclusion of the underfunding of social services by successive Tory and New Labour governments since the 1980s. The Fair Access to Care Services policy was introduced by New Labour to ensure social services provision was consistent across England and Wales. It turns out that the only consistency being achieved is the decimation of essential social services for hundreds of thousands of working class people. www.socialistparty.o rg.uk SteveGerman
  • Score: 0

11:10pm Fri 10 Dec 10

SteveGerman says...

Hundreds of thousands of young people have taken
to the streets against the Con-Dem destruction of
education. Cutting Education Maintenance Allowance
(EMA), raising tuition fees to £9,000 and huge funding cuts
have seen students from schools, colleges and universities up
and down the country walk out, protest and demonstrate in
defence of their right to a free, high-quality education.

This hated government is full of millionaire ministers, who
themselves enjoyed the privilege of a free education and full
grants.
They will be hoping that their vote to raise fees to £9,000
this week puts an end to the protests. However, this is only
the beginning of the fight. The poll tax was voted through in
1988 only to be thrown out in 1991 after a campaign of mass
non-payment made it unworkable. This movement not only
defeated the Poll Tax but ended Margaret Thatcher’s reign.
The Con-Dem government is much weaker. A mass
movement of students alongside workers, who have the power
to bring the country to a standstill, would shake the coalition
government to its core. Students have already started to win.
As a result of this campaign the Welsh Assembly and Scottish
Parliament have said they will not cut EMA and the Welsh
Assembly will subsidise the increase in fees.
After the vote on 9 December the movement must maintain
momentum and offer a way forward for students and young
people. Local anti-cuts campaigns need to be built in every
school, college and university across the country to respond
to events in the new year. January will see the end of new
EMA claims; March may see strike action by teachers and
lecturers in the National Union of Teachers and University
and College lecturers’ Union. A national education shutdown
in defence of education is needed to escalate the campaign in
this period.
The current leadership of the National Union of Students
have is guilty of a dereliction of duty by stepping back from
leading a campaign against the biggest ever attacks on
education in this country. That is why local campaigns need
to come together on a national scale to organise the next
stage of the movement.
The attacks on education are only one part of the
government’s wider attacks on all public services. It is vital
these attacks are not fought in isolation but combined with
the struggle in defence of every job and service.

www.socialistparty.o
rg.uk
Hundreds of thousands of young people have taken to the streets against the Con-Dem destruction of education. Cutting Education Maintenance Allowance (EMA), raising tuition fees to £9,000 and huge funding cuts have seen students from schools, colleges and universities up and down the country walk out, protest and demonstrate in defence of their right to a free, high-quality education. This hated government is full of millionaire ministers, who themselves enjoyed the privilege of a free education and full grants. They will be hoping that their vote to raise fees to £9,000 this week puts an end to the protests. However, this is only the beginning of the fight. The poll tax was voted through in 1988 only to be thrown out in 1991 after a campaign of mass non-payment made it unworkable. This movement not only defeated the Poll Tax but ended Margaret Thatcher’s reign. The Con-Dem government is much weaker. A mass movement of students alongside workers, who have the power to bring the country to a standstill, would shake the coalition government to its core. Students have already started to win. As a result of this campaign the Welsh Assembly and Scottish Parliament have said they will not cut EMA and the Welsh Assembly will subsidise the increase in fees. After the vote on 9 December the movement must maintain momentum and offer a way forward for students and young people. Local anti-cuts campaigns need to be built in every school, college and university across the country to respond to events in the new year. January will see the end of new EMA claims; March may see strike action by teachers and lecturers in the National Union of Teachers and University and College lecturers’ Union. A national education shutdown in defence of education is needed to escalate the campaign in this period. The current leadership of the National Union of Students have is guilty of a dereliction of duty by stepping back from leading a campaign against the biggest ever attacks on education in this country. That is why local campaigns need to come together on a national scale to organise the next stage of the movement. The attacks on education are only one part of the government’s wider attacks on all public services. It is vital these attacks are not fought in isolation but combined with the struggle in defence of every job and service. www.socialistparty.o rg.uk SteveGerman
  • Score: 0

11:21pm Fri 10 Dec 10

the-doctor46 says...

stevegerman - you're so annoying, that I think I would probably punch you in the face if I met you in person. No one likes you cut and paste **** you complete retard!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
stevegerman - you're so annoying, that I think I would probably punch you in the face if I met you in person. No one likes you cut and paste **** you complete retard!!!!!!!!!!!!!! the-doctor46
  • Score: 0

11:23pm Fri 10 Dec 10

the-doctor46 says...

no wonder the police have started beating the protestors if they are anything like you
no wonder the police have started beating the protestors if they are anything like you the-doctor46
  • Score: 0

8:54am Sat 11 Dec 10

east-ender says...

the-doctor46 wrote:
stevegerman - you're so annoying, that I think I would probably punch you in the face if I met you in person. No one likes you cut and paste **** you complete retard!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Thats not like you the-doctor-46 :)), mid you if you cant sleep read his posts you won't make it to the end of one.........
[quote][p][bold]the-doctor46[/bold] wrote: stevegerman - you're so annoying, that I think I would probably punch you in the face if I met you in person. No one likes you cut and paste **** you complete retard!!!!!!!!!!!!!![/p][/quote]Thats not like you the-doctor-46 :)), mid you if you cant sleep read his posts you won't make it to the end of one......... east-ender
  • Score: 0

7:37pm Mon 13 Dec 10

JasonBourne says...

According to the figures released by the Government today the funding cut for Somerset County Council is 1.96% (£7.2 million) next year and 2.14% (a further 7.2 million) the year after. The BBC is reporting that the cut for some Councils is 8.9% next year alone. In light of this how can these cuts to roads, libraries and youth services be anything other than ideologically driven by a man who seems to have only got into politics to make services worse? Time for a rethink I believe, but if Scrooge isn’t for turning, perhaps in light of this and the outrageous pay he seems to be offering a favoured few managers at our expense we, the public, who also seem to be forking out for allowances and expenses to an already wealthy man, should be demanding a change at the top at County Hall.

The list is here:

http://www.local.odp
m.gov.uk/finance/111
2/grant.htm#con

West Somerset and Taunton Deane seem to have come off much worse
According to the figures released by the Government today the funding cut for Somerset County Council is 1.96% (£7.2 million) next year and 2.14% (a further 7.2 million) the year after. The BBC is reporting that the cut for some Councils is 8.9% next year alone. In light of this how can these cuts to roads, libraries and youth services be anything other than ideologically driven by a man who seems to have only got into politics to make services worse? Time for a rethink I believe, but if Scrooge isn’t for turning, perhaps in light of this and the outrageous pay he seems to be offering a favoured few managers at our expense we, the public, who also seem to be forking out for allowances and expenses to an already wealthy man, should be demanding a change at the top at County Hall. The list is here: http://www.local.odp m.gov.uk/finance/111 2/grant.htm#con West Somerset and Taunton Deane seem to have come off much worse JasonBourne
  • Score: 0

5:19pm Mon 20 Dec 10

SteveGerman says...

the-doctor46 wrote:
stevegerman - you're so annoying, that I think I would probably punch you in the face if I met you in person. No one likes you cut and paste **** you complete retard!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
So you are now reduced to making threats to 'punch in the face' a socialist political opponent 'Doctor'. Should you ever meet them, that is! I suggest that you select the time of our 'meeting' and I'll decide the place!! I won't even insist that you reveal your real name first, rather than hiding lke the cowardly thug (that you so clearly are)behind your anonymous nickname!Of course like all bullies and thugs you won't have the 'wherewithall' to agree to these terms!! LOL
[quote][p][bold]the-doctor46[/bold] wrote: stevegerman - you're so annoying, that I think I would probably punch you in the face if I met you in person. No one likes you cut and paste **** you complete retard!!!!!!!!!!!!!![/p][/quote]So you are now reduced to making threats to 'punch in the face' a socialist political opponent 'Doctor'. Should you ever meet them, that is! I suggest that you select the time of our 'meeting' and I'll decide the place!! I won't even insist that you reveal your real name first, rather than hiding lke the cowardly thug (that you so clearly are)behind your anonymous nickname!Of course like all bullies and thugs you won't have the 'wherewithall' to agree to these terms!! LOL SteveGerman
  • Score: 0

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