Sedgemoor floods spark emergency talks

Bridgwater Mercury: Flooding at Hamp Canal. Flooding at Hamp Canal.

COUNCIL officials have held emergency talks with the Environment Agency to assess the damage left by the deluge of rain across Sedgemoor.

The heavens opened on Wednesday and continued on and off until the early hours of Monday (November 26), flooding homes and businesses and causing motorists to abandon their vehicles.

An Agency spokesman said a meeting will be held on tomorrow (November 29) with Taunton Deane and Sedgemoor District Councils, Somerset County Council, Somerset Drainage Board, land owners, the NFU and others.

He said: “Some of the things discussed will be the management of flood waters and flood plans.”

SDC staff have being working to reduce the impact on Sedgemoor residents and property, and multi- agency emergency meetings are being held regularly to respond to local forecasts.

A SDC spokesman said: “Strategic housing staff continue to be on-standby in case emergency evacuations are required in the district – concerned residents can get in touch on 0845-4082540.”

Bridgwater Town Council clerk Alan Hurford said the low level land on the Meads has flooded with Bridgwater football ground, Fordgate, Cannington, Stawell, Moorland and other areas.

He said: “The rain has had an effect on land already sodden.”

The county council donated thousands of man hours, put up hundreds of barriers and cones, helped dozens of motorists and even had to make more flood warning signs.

Deputy leader David Hall said: “Our staff and contractors have freally got stuck in helping keep Somerset moving despite the extraordinary conditions over the past week.”

Workers have even stood in a fast-flowing river removing branches wedged against a bridge which threatened to flood homes, have waded through filthy water to help residents and have arranged for stranded motorists to stay in local pubs.

Comments (5)

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9:37am Thu 29 Nov 12

RustyKnight says...

To be fair the heavens opened in March just after a hosepipe ban was announced, and it hasn't stopped rainig since.
To be fair the heavens opened in March just after a hosepipe ban was announced, and it hasn't stopped rainig since. RustyKnight

9:42am Thu 29 Nov 12

awayswing says...

I would like to thank all the people who have worked so hard during these difficult and dangerous floods.
I believe it may be premature to talk of assessing the flood damage as the floods appear to be nowhere near over.I have been trying to get to Yeovil for over a week now and all the roads are from Bridgwater are still closed.Surely the time to assess the damage is when the floods are gone.
I would like to thank all the people who have worked so hard during these difficult and dangerous floods. I believe it may be premature to talk of assessing the flood damage as the floods appear to be nowhere near over.I have been trying to get to Yeovil for over a week now and all the roads are from Bridgwater are still closed.Surely the time to assess the damage is when the floods are gone. awayswing

5:22pm Thu 29 Nov 12

hevjay says...

RustyKnight wrote:
To be fair the heavens opened in March just after a hosepipe ban was announced, and it hasn't stopped rainig since.
My thoughts exactly!
[quote][p][bold]RustyKnight[/bold] wrote: To be fair the heavens opened in March just after a hosepipe ban was announced, and it hasn't stopped rainig since.[/p][/quote]My thoughts exactly! hevjay

8:37pm Mon 3 Dec 12

scally666 says...

when was the last time local rivers were dredged??
some time ago me thinks
when was the last time local rivers were dredged?? some time ago me thinks scally666

9:00pm Mon 3 Dec 12

the voice of common sense says...

When the docks closed (about 1970)

If the rivers were dredged and the mud mixed with lime and cement, then placed on the river banks it would remove the mud and strengthen the banks and prevent such severe flooding.

Simples
When the docks closed (about 1970) If the rivers were dredged and the mud mixed with lime and cement, then placed on the river banks it would remove the mud and strengthen the banks and prevent such severe flooding. Simples the voice of common sense

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